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20121205
20121213
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
've had those things happen, do they have a productive environment to solve problems? not necessarily. they're still overcoming the divisiveness, the hard feelings from all of that." at the time reporters wanted to know whether rick snyder would support what is known as a right to work law. the idea of right to work is simple. under a right to work law, employees of a union shop don't have to pay union dues. the employees get the benefit of the union, the higher wages and better health care, all of that, but they do not have to pay for it. why pay money if you can have something for free? for unions, the results of this are close to catastrophic which is why republicans and big business love right to work laws. they are a way of destroying unions. the same heritage foundation that will be jim demint's new home says union membership fell by 15% in states that passed right to work. union organizing fell by half, passing a right to work law stops unions and it stops organizing. on the labor left, the economic policy institute reports that wages fall by more than 3% after you institute ri
will say however that the value of doing it now in a low-interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principle and therefore this will be a more valuable thing in second, because the phones are so low interest rate, they will be on our books for a larger -- so frankly loans in the past and hit that limit so even though it's a trillion dollar portfolio, the value is actually small for the old loans and it will be quite valuable for these new worth largest rate loans. >> mr. chairman if i could have time briefly for more questions. i see that fha is now making loans to people that three years ago we were foreclosing on. and that is a very different standard than what exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes and here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores and lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced
donald payne to require firsthand knowledge of how the workplace works and the environment in which those miners go to work every day. in the classroom, lynn woolsey continues to fight for women and working families. she was -- i want to say harsh, but i will say tough advocate. making sure that women were represented in the stem fields and the careers and women and young women had access to the sciences and to technology and to math and engineering. lynn woolsey worked to ensure kids had access at every education -- every education opportunity and a well-rounded curriculum to meet their social and emotional needs. american families have benefited from lynn woolsey's fierced a vow casey. harsh, spirited. that's our advocate, lynn. i will miss here contributions on the education committee for the years to come. she's fought tirelessly to protect the environment. most especially in the sonoma coast of san francisco bay and hopefully the president will follow her lead and designate further protections of our ocean and marine habitat in that area of our precious coast. i am very grateful for
nothing to remedy it. the damage we have done to our environment may be getting worse. carbon dioxide emissions were at a record high in 2011. and when the numbers in 2012 are totaled they're expected to be even worse. the efforts to cush these hammer unfortunately emissions are simply failing. the rhetoric coming out of the white house has been fine. the president obama even mentioned quote the destructive power of a warming planet in his acceptance speech last month but time for talk is over. now the is the time for action. here with me now to tell me if we should start preparing for the earth as we know it. joe rome. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> we're very close or even maybe at a tipping point beyond which the capacity to pull back the impact of co2 pouring intoous atmosphere may well nigh impossible. >> no question it's getting--the impacts are getting more noticeable. we're seeing super storms we haven't seen before. hurricane sandy was the most destructive ever reported. it's the combination of the warmer ocean temperatures make the storms stronger,
ratings. booker calls chris christie vulnerable on women's issues and the environment. chris christie is riding a wave of popularity because of how he responded to hurricane sandy. but according to a poll, in a matchup with booker, chris christie prevailed 53% to 35%. >> he's eyeing a more probable run for the u.s. senate in 2014. so clearly, we'll see how it plays out. mayor booker is just coming off of his food stamp challenge where he lived off of $31 a week in food. so he made a lot of headlines. >> the two of them have a pretty good working relationship. they've praised one another and were featured in a tongue and cheek video together, collaborating back in may. >> not a dull time in jersey politics. my home state. here's your wednesday forecast, everybody. heavy rain and gusty winds from miami to orlando. showers to the north, spreading into the carolinas. light snow in north dakota, the northern rockies. up to a foot in the sierra range and rainy from l.a. up to pacific coast. >> 44 in seattle. 52 in sacramento. 40s from oklahoma to new york. near 60 in dallas and new orleans.
that the framework and the environment would promote such -- promote competition. it's good for innovation. it's good from the investment and so it's got to be -- we've got to look at it in a broad framework and never forgetting our framework to stimulate competition. >> to the commissioner. it's wonderful to see you and hear your testimony. we've heard the suggestion today that auction rules that promote competition could result in lower auction revenues. but isn't it also true that allowing one or two firms to effectively shut out other competing bids could result in less revenue? >> i think that that is possibly true, but i think fundamentally we need to hold these auctions in a way where there are opportunities for everyone that will include incumbents and new entrants and we need to make sure that the revenues we raise are sufficient to support the first responder network authority. >> so two book ends, money and competition. i yield back. >> the chair recognizes the gentleman from nebraska, mr. terry. >> thank you. we'll go with the chairman on this one. i believe the auction should happen as s
groups, such as the global climate coalition, information council for the environment, heartland institute, annapolis center, and cooler heads coalition are created or enlisted to propagate this message of doubt. deniers question the motives and engage in harassment of the real credentialed climate scientists. well, for the record, there has been scientific debate regarding climate change. ideas have been tested, theories have been ventured, and the evidence keeps coming back to the same conclusion: increased carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from human-related sources is strengthening the greenhouse effect, adding to recent warming, and acidifying the oceans. actually, the evidence coming in tends to confirm the worst and most dangerous projections. mr. president, may i interrupt my remarks and ask unanimous consent that morning business be extended until 2:00 p.m. with senators permitted to speak therein for up to ten minutes each. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. whitehousemr. whitehouse: ak unanimous consent that that exchange be moved to the beginning or the end
are not in a position to do things that we otherwise would be in a position to do in terms of shaping the environment to prevent war. so in my view, america's fiscal picture increases the risk of conflict around the globe. maybe not always involving the u.s., but certainly the risks are increasing globally based on our fiscal picture. the fifth point i would want to make is that the budget deal requires us to deal with a full deck of cards. and those people who keep wanting to take things off the table, in my view, are not being rational in terms of addition and subtraction. and when i say a full deck of cards, that includes defense participating in deficit reduction. this cannot be in the case of defense a sledgehammer approach. it's going to take a long runway dealing with these issues over time to give the defense department, and they can make, in my view, very significant changes in the budget, but do it in a way that does not damage our security. doing it abruptly as the fiscal cliff does or in a very compressed time frame is not only inefficient, i think it endangers our security and our risk.
of the vietnam war, it was the inaccessibility of my environment that made me feel the least welcome. i returned to a country not ready to receive me as a man who now used a wheelchair. that was the reality of an honors soldier would overcome -- the reality had to overcome until the united states improved laws to protect disabled. it is still a reality in many places overseas, places for a better at disabled citizens will likely travel in the future either for business or pleasure. we must ratify this treaty because protect the disabled and the united states of america and the right thing to do throughout the world. let me just again think senator kerry and senator lugar for their hard work on this treaty and we look forward to our colleagues voting for it in just a short hour from now. yield the floor. >> mr. president, how much time the reigns? >> 27 minutes remaining. >> and how much time -- >> about the same. >> mr. president camille for minutes, three minutes to the senator from delaware. >> thank you, mr. president. thank you word of foreign relations committee in your real leadership on t
that as a preference, i could not have. but to hear people talk about them, going into an environment like that, i white say that i actually like it. -- i might say that i actually like it and that is still a huge part of the american television experience that gets sold short by talking about anytime, anywhere now. there is a certain amount of escapism and passivity in roaming around the television jungle, finding things that you did not know were there. >> michael powell on the future of television, tonight on c-span 2. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are continuing our series, looking at different parts of the fiscal cliff talks. joining us now is robert levenson, a senior defense analyst at bloomberg government. let's begin with what secret -- with what sequestration means. caller -- guest: it is a funny term. if you have looked it up on google 20 months ago, it would have something to do with coal and carbon, but this is about automatic cuts going into place known as sequestration. host: how did this come about? where is it headed? caller: as we recall from last year, there was a
economic growth. regulation is necessary to protest at -- to protect our environment and keep our food safe. but regulations cost money to follow. the more expensive a regulation, the less money a business has to give raises or hire new people. we need to have a balanced approach to regulation. we need to weigh the benefit of any given regulation against the impact it will have on job creation. that is why we should implement something like senator paul's act, so that congress that's the final say on it. -- gets the final say honeon it. [applause] getting control of our debt. it is critically important. it is not enough. we need to do more. we should expand our domestic energy industry. american innovation has given us access to massive new deposits of oil and natural gas, making america one of the most energy- rich countries on the planet. this new energy opens all kinds of new middle-class jobs come from the fields and platforms woodrow, to the manufacturing plants that return to the united states with a lower cost of energy, and these are the types of jobs we need most, right now. lower
have to reduce the debt, we have to reduce taxes, reduce regulation, create an environment in which people can go out and create jobs and hire more workers and then we can lower the unemployment rate and this will not be an issue anymore. host: michael tanner of the cato institute, and michael bivens of the economic policy institute. up next, will continue our "america by the numbers" series. the future of u.s. energy production in 2014. we will be joined by adam sieminski and frank verrastro. >> i think writers institute is something that is very important within the culture. we are a culture of words, of voices. words are key to our imagination, our capacity to invasion -- envision things. we ourselves are not completely tied to print on the page, but there is no other art forms so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, joined "book tv" and "american history tv" as we look at the historic and literary life of new york's capital, albany. >> the chiefs of staff had to
manual labor job. we are moving from that manual labor, low-skill jobs environment, to one in which he will have to have more education and skills. that is the reality of globalization, and i do not think you will have to avoid that. where to put more attention to and on getting people the skills -- we have to put more attention and getting people the skills. we will never have thousands of people sitting at sewing machines making t-shirts. host: another area where your groups seemed to disagree is whether the unemployment insurance creates a disincentive to look for work. mr. josh bivens, we start with you on this subject. caller: the two -- guest: the two previous callers identified the root problem -- there are not enough jobs. the ratio is still over three- to-one. if we could wave a magic wand, we would still have a large majority of unemployed workers looking for jobs. that is not a problem of skills. it is not a problem of employers dying to hire, but there are not the people out there. we just do not have the demand for services in the economy. that is like cutting off this sou
and not improve the environment. we need a discussion about tax policy but follow the principle, the greater the gain the greater the burden you bare. many conservatives think that. they are running the debate and totally ahistorical. >> i think this is a really important point about what else favors the wealthy in our tax system. one of the critical issues is the system of deductions. today, the way deductions work, the mortgage deductions or charitable deduction. if you give $10,000, you do $10,000 of a mortgage amount in a year. because of the way rates work as a deduction, it's $3500 if you are in the rate of 35%. and $1500 if you are a middle class family in the 15% marginal rate. it's $10,000. same for two families and much bigger value. it's upsidedown. in a tax plan we put forward, we addressed that issue. we transformed everything into an 18% credit. it's fair across the board. deductions are a way, a big way the tax system favors the well off and well-to-do. it's one of the reasons people are cynical about taxes. conservatives who argue about making the system fair. the best way is
in certain social media environments or play games. it could be learning. it could be education. the thing you don't want to do is take your eye off the ball to let your children start downloading things you're unaware of or interacting which is not consistent where they should be tracked especially the location. that is the biggest area of concern. being able to track their location precisely. alisyn: sure. that is the thing that sends a schiffer down parents spines. we know there are predators out there. >> yes. alisyn: lawrence, aren't their laws against tracking whereabouts of kids under 18 years old? >> well there are laws that apply to mobile applications but what we're seeing here is growing pains in the industry. we saw some of the same debates when we first started talking about the use of cookies in internet advertising and tracking the usage of internet consumers and here the mobile application developers are trying to strike a proper balance between the convenience of the technology and the privacy rights involved. and the ftc has recently released a report that encourages the
of environment. i don't know, i think i need these. >> mike: but clayton, i know you do this i follow you on twitter. you look at techie stuff like she looks at boots. >> clayton: i do, but i don't impulse buy them because i research them. >> alisyn: you're different 21% of the respondents of the survey say that they do spend, they do impulse buy technology. >> clayton: i think where they get you, this is what they do, they get you, right? it's the checkout aisle. you're in home depot and have lumber on a cart and bringing the lumber up to the front and check out and suddenly a box of chicklets up there, i need some gum and kit cats. >> mike: my co-anchor in philadelphia, chanel marie jones, where she buys her socks? whole foods at a grocery store. >> clayton: she wants organic cotton. >> mike: they're hideous, horrifying. >> alisyn: impulse buy. >> mike: impulse. >> clayton: that's why the walgreen's and other stores worked so well when other stores have gone out of business, drug stores and you're there to get a prescription and you know what-- >> i didn't know we were blowing 200 a
before the end of the year hopefully. if the environment is poisoned like it was after the stimulus, after the health care debate, the next four years will be ugh low. >> that's true. the higher number of women increases the chances. we will see. >> i saw the women here smiling. we were talking about how collaborative they were. the guys, not so much. >> we don't smile. i agree. the more women the better. i'm agreeing with you. can i say nothing? i said the more women, the better. i'm agreeing with you. the more women, the less self destructive egos and getting to a deal. do you have a problem with that. >> no,i don't. >> go with it. i give up. >> all right. still ahead, hollywood mogul joins us on set and author sebastian younger will be here. more morning joe in a moment. ♪ for over 40 years, we've brought our passion for fine coffee and espresso to people everywhere. but one place was impossible, until now. our lattes, espresso and brewed coffee, now in your home from a machine like no other. and now $50 off through january 1st. the verismo® system, by starbucks. and now $50 o
and troubled environment. so there is so much to talk about in the innovation area. let me just mention a few things that we are focused on and then we can get to some questions. one, i think in the area we have been talking about unskilled workforce, how much there is a skill gap, skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to clear policies we probably need to do a little better in clearly defining challenge. first of all i don't think there's any question that the main recent that we are having higher unemployment right now is not structurastructura l. it is fundamentally difficult. it is fundamentally a lack of demand that is still in our economy as army passionate as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition, that's ben bernanke and former ed lazar have all embraced our problems now are more about demand, construction, should not undermine the fundamental importance of dealing with skills or that we may face temporary or future skill gaps. i think there's three reasons why we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemp
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)